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Monthly Archives: January 2013

How important is it that Colors Flow from Room to Room?

 

I am often asked about the necessity of making colors flow from room to room in a home and if it is necessary. Sometimes the need to coordinate or blend with a neighboring room is an absolute, for example if the rooms do not have doors between them or no existing wall to separate them. If this is the case then the use of a color that makes it flow should be considered. But what is “flow”? A color that makes an easy transition would be one that is a hue in the same color family as the original room. For example, if a room has deep orange on its walls then the adjoining room could have a lighter orange or peach in it, or a muted version of the original orange would also work.

 

When adjoining rooms have a door to separate them the necessity of a color that flows is not necessary. Some people carry a theme throughout their homes and in this case perhaps all the rooms should flow, but most common today is a variety of themes, if any, and different styles in different rooms, therefore different colors.

 

With the popularity of great rooms in today’s homes the use of color flow is common. You will see kitchens and adjoining family rooms in colors that work together because essentially they are the same room. If there is a textile pattern in a room like this then they can use one color from the pattern in the kitchen and another color in the pattern for the family room, making this textile the accent and the “glue” that holds this color scheme together.

Here is an example of using a textile (the pillows) as the basis for the color in both rooms; they all have gray, yellow, black and white in the scheme. Note the yellow backsplash in the kitchen.

In this room red is the unifying color, it appears on the pillows and in the rug color in the living space and on the walls in the kitchen. Yellow is a second unifying color, it appears on the stools in the kitchen on the walls in the hallway to the right. A third color used is green, seen in the rug, on the kitchen stools and on the upper wall next to the refrigerator.

 

 

This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

~mg

 

 

 

 

If you have a basic item in your home that is still in good condition such as a carpet or sofa and you can’t afford to replace it here are some suggestions on how to update your color scheme.
You can approach this dilemma by finding a pattern that has your current color in it and has new colors alongside it in that pattern. Taking those new colors you can introduce a new wall color or accent items such as pillows.
Let’s say you have a blue sofa in good condition.

Add a pattern with the blue and several other colors in it.

Now you have several colors to use in the new color scheme.

You can also use a new piece of art to create a color scheme. In this illustration we are using a red chair as our starting point.

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Shown here is artwork with the current red and new colors.

New accent colors can include the following hues and white or light blue could be a good wall color to show them off!

This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

~mg

 

 

 

We’re all familiar with the 3 R’s – reduce, reuse, recycle – but we would like to add a 4th “R” to that list! Repurpose!

Repurposing old and outdated furniture is a simple way to help reduce landfill waste and cut down on the carbon footprint required to make and ship new furniture. Plus, it’s just plain fun!

 

Some tips for refinishing old furniture include:

*You can paint metal: You can paint metal, just make sure to prime the surface first!

*The more you sand, the better you’ll get: The more you sand, the more you’ll pick up a technique. You don’t want to sand so deeply that you go beyond the top layer of wood. Learning how your sander handles will also help you when you “distress” painted objects.

*Don’t take shortcuts: If a piece has hardware or drawers, remove them entirely for prep and painting. Because these areas get a lot of use, they are ripe for eventual paint flaking. Sand drawer edges carefully so the old paint is gone before applying new. Two coats of sealer should give the drawers “armor” for future use.

 

Now that you’ve got the basics, here are some of our favorite repurposed projects from around the web!

 

Make shelves out of old drawers.

http://www.remodelaholic.com/2012/06/unique-drawer-shelves/

Make a coffee table from an old door

http://www.diynetwork.com/decorating/22-cleverly-repurposed-and-revamped-coffee-and-end-tables/pictures/index.html

This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

 

~mg