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Troubleshooting

Well, how you can fix at least one of your paint problems anyway.

Avoid painting interior or exterior surfaces when the temperatures are too cold.Interior Solutions

A true do-it-yourselfer knows that not every project goes according to plan. Painting is no exception. Coalescence void is a common problem occurring when paint doesn’t form a continuous film.

Coalescence void happens usually when a surface temperature is too cold, below 50 degrees. Don’t leave this problem unfixed. There are ways to avoid this unfortunate result.

Coalescence void can be avoided by NOT painting interior or exterior surfaces when the temperatures are too cold. Late afternoon painting in unheated areas are vulnerable because the temperature will continue to decrease during the night and prevent proper paint film formation.

Heating the freshly painted surface causes the paint to properly spread before it dries if paint coalescence has already occurred.

Priming is essential for better adhesion, sheen uniformity, mildew control and durability. Select a top quality interior paint in the color and sheen of your choice.

~This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

Now is the perfect time to turn your attention to some interior painting projects. Whether you are trying to sell your house or just want to freshen it up, a new coat of paint can work wonders! To make your painting job go even faster and ensure a fabulous end result, it’s important to spend a little time researching the best primer for your job.

All-in-one paint and primers
There are many all-in-one “paint and primer” products available today. While these products work well in some situations, there are some instances when you should spend the extra time priming and painting separately. Glossy and slick surfaces, areas that have undergone extensive repair, and even when making drastic color changes are a few of the instances when you should consider the use of a specialty primer. You can always consult your local paint professional to see if the all-in-one option is a good one for you.

White primer
Taking the time to prime your walls first can actually save time by helping the finish coat develop its optimal color quicker and in fewer coats. If you’ve chosen an off-white or light paint color a regular white primer should work just fine.

Gray or tinted primer
If you’ve chosen a rich, dark color it is a good idea to work with your local paint store to get your primer tinted to be close to your final paint color as you can. Because tinted primers contain less white pigment, it helps decrease the contrast between the primer and paint color which means the paint covers better with less coats. Gray primer is also a good option for rich colors, especially red.

Picking the right primer will help ensure the perfect paint job!

 

~This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

 

 

Caulk failure is the loss of the protective moisture seal due to the loss of initial adhesion and flexibility.

Good caulk will help you save energy, avoid moisture damage and prevent pest problems. The best caulk for the job depends on the situation. If you didn’t get it right the first time around, there are ways to improve and fix caulk failure.

 

There are three types of caulk failure: adhesive, cohesive, and substrate. Simply put, the bond between the caulk and the substrate can fail, the caulk itself can tear, or the substrate can break. Problems with caulked joints are commonly due to one of two errors. Either the substrate was not effectively prepared, or the wrong product was selected. Consider how it will be used before choosing a product.

 

First, consider what materials the joint is made of and how much movement it is likely to encounter. Silicone, for example, adheres well to glass and tile but poorly to wood. Although products with different chemistries claim to be flexible, some are better suited for frequent joint movement. For most interior painting, 100 percent acrylic caulks, are recommended. They will seal cracks and adhere to most surfaces, even when moisture is present. Paint won’t stick to pure 100 percent silicone caulk. Remember that caulk generally is not recommended for gaps that exceed .5″ wide at their midpoint.

 

To spearhead the problem from the beginning, try priming. Priming is essential for better adhesion, sheen uniformity, mildew control, and durability. We recommend an undercoat to help ensure the caulk will have the best chance to succeed. Then select a top quality  interior paint in the color and sheen of your choice.

 

 

~This post inspired/contributed by ColorGuild. ColorGuild, the global paint and color authority, is a member based organization serves as a definitive resource on color and coatings.  As a member of ColorGuild, we welcome their contributions and appreciate their opinions.

 

Disposal of Paint Is Relatively Easy!

Oftentimes after a painting project a customer has unused paint, leaving them with a critical question. What do they do with it? Should they keep it for touch up or dispose of it? There are benefits to either choice.

Disposal of paint products has become significantly easier in the past few years. Oregon in this time period established a recycling program for unused paint called PaintCare. Customers who wish to dispose of unused paint just have to drive to one of the PaintCare collection sites and drop it off for FREE. Select Miller Paint locations are among these collection sites. If you’re having a hard time finding a drop off point call your local Miller Paint and they can direct you to a collection site, or go to PaintCare.org and type your zip code into the search bar labeled “Locate a Collection Center Near You.” Additionally one can always check the Metro website to find additional drop off points.

Alternatively one can opt to keep unused paint for touch up. Nothing touches up your painted wall better than the same can of paint you used originally! There are several tricks one can use to keep their excess paint viable for the future. One of these is do not let your paint freeze. Storing paint in a heated garage or closet is an excellent way to prevent freezing. Another tip is to move your paint into a smaller container, like a quart can or two, if you have about half a gallon or less in your can. Changing containers is also a good idea if your can is rusty. Finally to preserve your paint you should consider storing your paint upside down if your can seals well. Wrapping the lid in cellophane and taping the cellophane to can is an excellent way to prevent messes in case your can doesn’t seal well. Practice these tips and your paint should be ready for use the next time you open the can.

Josh – East Vancouver

An Example Of Surfactant Bleeding or Leaching

It’s that time of year again where we all need to be thinking of many problems that can occur in the exterior painting world. Having a couple of customers that we have had to guide through a quick wash before the sun returns and bakes the problem to surface, we were able to avoid a non-fixable Surfactant bleed problem.  Surfactant bleed (leaching) is one that is caused from our Northwest’s climate and wet or damp conditions in freshly painted surfaces with latex paint.

Surfactant is a soapy substance that comes to the surface and is more noticeable in darker colors due to the higher use of surfactants in colorants. Remember not to panic if you find this problem on your painting projects. A simple rinsing when caught in time or added detergent with use of a soft brush can fix almost all problems. In non-protected areas rain can be the simple solution as well.

In all painting jobs planning is the best way to prevent mishaps like this. Living in the NW can however cause un-predictable scenarios such as Surfactant bleeding, but we here at Miller Paint are ready to help in any instance you run in to!